Artist Collection: IcepickVasectomy

There’s a weird fluffy meme that I’m not actually even sure anyone else remembers where someone mentioned raptors meaning like hawks and birds and shit and someone drew a pic of a velociraptor terrorizing fluffies as a response so I want to add that as a weird event in my game.

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There’s a lost scene where she finds that thing under her owner’s table hinting that he used to have more fluffies at one point. She’s retarded so she thinks it’s actually a baby she found.

Sculpting all of Polygon’s little fat rolls was immensely satisfying.

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Dude I never thought I’d see this stuff again !!!

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every day you make me more and more hyped for your game

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I can imagine trying to do this oldschool with manually designing meshes would be a pain in the sphincter.

Apparently once upon a time, back in the early days of graphics, people would need to manually specify geometry by numeric arguments rather than through a proper GUI. Some coders got so familiar with it they had the vertex coordinates of the Utah Teapot completely memorized.

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Lmao I remember that! I think how that started was someone said that raptors (birds) would likely be one of the primary predators of fluffies, so someone drew that in response

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It’s a really good time to be a 3d artist and an entry level game dev. Modern technology makes it really accessible as long as you’re willing to put the time in. When I first started I remember there was a method for modeling that had just been phased out called NURBs. I wonder if that’s the method you’re talking about?

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That’s one of the first times I just busted out laughing at a joke about fluffies lol

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NURBs were primarily used for curved surfaces, being a kind of two-dimensional spline based system. Back in ye olden days people would need to manually specify points in a 3d coordinate system in data files as raw data, or hand-roll simple software for assembling mesh files. Keep in mind 3D graphics has technically existed for longer than color displays on computers, since the earliest versions would render directly to plotters or printers.

The earliest non-trivial rendering object was the Utah Teapot, which began being used in the late 70s or early 80s.


(This one is more modern)

Before this you’d have scenes being primarily populated by simple geometric objects, but the Teapot was picked because it’s a simple enough object you can have a small data files, but it has certain useful properties, such as being able to cast shadows and reflections on itself, as well as having portions that can occlude other sections of geometry. It became so ubiquitous in the development of rendering engines and lighting systems that one of the SIGGRAPH circulars named it the sixth Euclidean solid.

It consisted of just under a thousand vertices, and more than one programmer at the time actually had the entire mesh network memorized and would just write it into files by hand since it was easier for them at the time. Personally I have a hard enough time remembering where I left my damn cell phone, let alone memorizing three thousand plus floating-point numbers.

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I always knew teapots were important in 3d art but I never really understood why. Thanks, that’s pretty interesting

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Just realized Vertex shat directly in front of Polygon.

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